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Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Family Link

Joining Together: My Child Has No Peer Group?

Consider the following scenario: David, a 10-year-old boy, runs home from school one day and shouts that he very much wants to start taking karate lessons. Here is the conversation between David and his mother:

David: Mom, I really want to start taking karate lessons. It is so cool and I already know three other boys in my class that are taking

How to Choose the Proper Footwear for Your Child

The seasons change; there is a special occasion; your child’s feet are growing; he/she just started walking; there are many exciting and everyday reasons to purchase new shoes. However, the purpose of shoes is to cushion, support and protect feet.  When feet are not properly supported, they cannot withstand the load they bear.  This may cause gait

“You Were Here First....”

As I was about to leave the hospital after giving birth to my son, my doctor entered my room (and I have to tell you, this wonderful doctor who had delivered my son, had delivered me 22 years earlier and, in those days of “G.P.’s” had been my only doctor since), put his hands on my shoulders, looked at me closely, and said, “remember Nancy, you were here first;

Would You Like A Closer Relationship With Your Teenage Son?

If you are reading this right now, then the answer is probably yes, or you know someone who is having difficulty with their teenage son and maybe you can offer them some constructive advice after reading this article.

The word teenage presumes your son has become a bar mitzvah, regardless if the event was accompanied by a ceremony or celebration. To

The Crier

Every early childhood graduation has one.  One crier.  One anxious, uncertain child.  One kid who finds it utterly impossible to get up on stage.  This is my child.

This year it was his Kindergarten graduation.  In the past two years’ of nursery celebrations, my son, “J” had been overwhelmed by emotion simply by walking down the aisle that

Strengthening Your Hands Can Be Fun

Many people incorrectly assume that Occupational Therapy is a field that focuses predominantly on fine motor skills. More specifically, the muscles of the hands. In our past articles, we have given you a taste of many of the areas included in the scope of Occupational Therapy (OT) including crawling and early gross motor development, participation in play,

Role Models

This is a tricky subject. I believe that most of us try to be the best role models for our children, but sometimes that has a tendency to go a little awry.  Like the mother who likes to watch reruns on her DVR, while her family is upstairs “doing homework.” She remains downstairs until it is safe so that no one will have any questions for her about the homework

Going, Going, Gone

It’s the last week of June, the time of year when many parents across the country are getting their children ready for their imminent departure to sleep-away camp. For most of our children, camp is a fun and rewarding experience filled with new friendships and excitement. In addition to physical and athletic activities, kids learn the important, long-lasting

Dear Rabbi Sam

Dear Rabbi Sam,

I am a bit embarrassed to even have to present this question, but here goes. My wife and I were both raised in Orthodox homes. We each have many siblings (I have five and she has seven). We both recall our Shabbos tables as festive, enjoyable, respectful, full of excitement, words of Torah and Songs for Shabbos. Flash forward

The Beauty of Getting Dirty

Think back to your childhood. Likely most of your fond memories had you digging for worms, finger painting or eating pasta (we called them noodles…) with your hands. You probably had some textures that you loved and some that you hated—probably still do—but you learned about the world through your sense of touch. We refer to this as your tactile sense.

Does My Child Need PT or OT?

Watching your children develop can be the most rewarding experience a parent can have.  You develop expectations for your children and hope they will achieve them.  When children are young, these expectations are small.  You await their first smiles, the first time they sit, roll over, crawl or take their first steps.  These milestones are expected to occur during

“If I Am Not For Myself, Who Will Be For Me?”

These words, commonly quoted within the Jewish world, and, I hope, throughout the general population, carry great meaning. As a Self-Esteem Facilitator and psychotherapist, it is my goal to help people understand that caring for oneself is a mandate and that, like the instructions given by flight attendants on airplanes, you must care for yourself first if you are